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Piracy Incident Report: Singapore Straits

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A detailed report from Allmode Security, with regular updates on piracy activity in the region of Indonesia this year. Incidents include multiple hijacks, boardings and attempted boardings. Despite the increased patrolling and extra monitoring of this particular region, pirates are still managing to board slow moving vessels whilst underway. Allmode advise continued enhanced vigilance in this piracy hotspot. 

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Singapore Piracy Incident Report: 506

Incident Type: Boarding
Area: Singapore Straits
Position: 01°16’N - 103°59’E
Date of Incident: 06/09/2015
Time of Incident: 10.30
Information Source: IMB 

Four robbers boarded an anchored tanker unnoticed. They broke into the engine room, stole engine spares and escaped. The Master informed the CSO of the security breach.

Allmode Comment:

It is essential, that all vessels which transit the region use enhanced security measures and ensure that their crew are well-drilled in anti-piracy procedures. If security is breached, then effective communications with other vessels in the area and the local ReCAAP Information Sharing Centre (ISC) is essential. They will help warn other vessels in the area and send out the nearest local patrols to try to apprehend the perpetrators.

Companies, CSO’s and Masters should evaluate the effectiveness of the controls already in place to prevent the illegal boarding, and taking control of a vessel and a full Risk Assessment should be conducted prior to any voyage to ascertain the likelihood of an incident occurring 

Singapore Piracy Incident Report: 481

Incident Type: Boarding
Area: Around 3nm SSW of Tanjung Ayam, Johor, Malaysia.
Position: 01°16’N - 104°11’E
Date of Incident: 23.04.15 REPORTED LATE
Time of Incident: 0415
Information Source: IMB 

Duty wiper on board a Product Tanker en route to Singapore, noticed two robbers armed with knives entering the engine room workshop. He immediately informed the C/E, who informed the Master. The Alarm was raised. Upon sounding of the alarm, the C/E saw five robbers leaving the engine room. The crew were mustered and a search was carried out. The robbers had stolen generator spares before escaping. The incident was reported to VTIS Singapore at 1010 LT. The Singapore Coast Guard boarded the tanker to investigate.

Allmode Comment:

Boarding whilst underway is the most common type of piracy incident in SE Asia. The robbers will target the store rooms to steal engine spares, which are highly priced on the black market.
It is essential to report all incidents of crime to the relevant bodies in a timely manner to help warn other vessel.

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Singapore Piracy Incident Report: 418

Incident Type: Boarding
Area: Singapore Strait
Position: 01°10’N - 103°50’E
Date of Incident: 09.05.15
Time of Incident: 0140
Information Source: IMB 

Two robbers, armed with long knives, boarded a bulk carrier underway. The duty crew noticed the robbers and raised the alarm. All of the crew members were mustered in the citadel, except the bridge team who informed the Singapore VTIS. They advised the ship to continue sailing at slow speed while waiting for the Singapore navy to approach the ship, After an amount of time had passed the crew thoroughly searched the ship and found no robbers on-board and nothing had been stolen. The search result was relayed to the VTIS and the Singapore navy.

Allmode Comment:
It is not recommended that the crew should carry out a search without the help of the authorities or a Maritime security team. It is well documented that the thieves will use violence against crew, therefore it is better to wait for the authorities to arrive and carry out the search, keeping crew out of harm’s way.

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Singapore Piracy Incident Report: 404

Incident Type: Suspicious Approach
Area: Singapore Strait
Position: 01°14’N - 104°07’E
Date of Incident: 27/04/15 REPORTED LATE
Time of Incident: 0230
Information Source: IMB 

Six persons in a fast moving unlit boat armed with guns and long knives, approached a Container ship underway. As the boat came closer to the ship, the Master raised the alarm and the crew were mustered. The duty AB directed the Aldis Lamp towards the boat, which resulted in the pirate boat moving away. The Singapore VTIS were informed.
Allmode Comment: The day before, in almost the same position, a Bulk Carrier had been boarded by two armed men. This report would suggest that this area is now the preferred area of operation for a pirate gang. As the incident the day before yielded no reward, they appeared to have increased the number of men and attempted another attack. Again, this proved unsuccessful and could indicate that this gang will continue, to target slow moving, low freeboard vessels transiting the same route. All vessels moving through the Singapore Straits will need to remain vigilant and have 24 hour watch-keeping Ensure that preventative measures are in place to make boarding difficult. 

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Singapore Piracy Incident Report: 402

Incident Type: Boarding
Area: Singapore Strait
Position: 01°15’N - 104°07’E
Date of Incident: 26/04/15 REPORTED LATE
Time of Incident: 0150
Information Source: IMB 

Two robbers boarded a Bulk Carrier whilst underway. The Master immediately raised the alarm and the crew were mustered. Upon hearing the alarm and seeing the crew respond, the pirates escaped empty handed. VTIS Singapore was informed.

Allmode Comment: Boarding of vessels whilst underway are becoming less common in the east bound corridor, this is possibly due to an increase in Anti-Piracy patrols. Boarding’s have now becoming more common at the western end of the Singapore Straits. Vessels need to be prepared and have all anti-piracy measures in place before entering the Straits, regardless of direction of passage.

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